Autoimmune reactions in diabetes complications

Posted on February 14, 2012

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Vascular disease

Chronic elevation of blood glucose level leads to damage of blood vessels (angiopathy). The endothelial cells lining the blood vessels take in more glucose than normal, since they don’t depend on insulin. They then form more surface glycoproteins than normal, and cause the basement membrane to grow thicker and weaker. In diabetes, the resulting problems are grouped under “microvascular disease” (due to damage to small blood vessels) and “macrovascular disease” (due to damage to the arteries).

However, some research challenges the theory of hyperglycemia as the cause of diabetic complications. The fact that 40% of diabetics who carefully control their blood sugar nevertheless develop neuropathy, and that some of those with good blood sugar control still develop nephropathy, requires explanation. It has been discovered that the serum of diabetics with neuropathy is toxic to nerves even if its blood sugar content is normal. Recent research suggests that in type 1 diabetics, the continuing autoimmune  disease which initially destroyed the beta cells of the pancreas may also cause retinopathy, neuropathy, and nephropathy. One researcher has even suggested that retinopathy may be better treated by drugs to suppress the abnormal immune system of diabetics than by blood sugar control. The familial clustering of the degree and type of diabetic complications indicates that genetics may also play a role in causing complications such as diabetic retinopathy. and nephropathy Non-diabetic offspring of type 2 diabetics have been found to have increased arterial stiffness and neuropathy despite normal blood glucose levels, and elevated enzyme levels associated with diabetic renal disease have been found in non-diabetic first-degree relatives of diabetics. Even rapid tightening of blood glucose levels has been shown to worsen rather than improve diabetic complications, though it has usually been held that complications would improve over time with more normal blood sugar, provided this could be maintained. However. one study continued for 41 months found that the initial worsening of complications from improved glucose control was not followed by the expected improvement in the complications.

http://www.news-medical.net/health/Diabetes-Complications.aspx

 

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