Kefir has antimutagenic and antioxidant properties, as shown in two different model systems

Posted on October 15, 2010

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Health and nutrition

Tibetan mushrooms [TM], Snow louts [SL] and kefir grains [KG ] and what ever other name the unique mother-culture is known by, are all the same mother-culture if it looks like this This is also true for what is also referred to as Yogurt Plant or Yogurt Mushroom in same parts of Europe. To help explain; the name Peter is known as Piere in France and Piere is Peter in an English speaking country. The reason kefir grains are referred to as TM appear to be due to consecutive passing down of the natural mother-culture, which at a point in time were cultured in Tibet. I recall reading that milk kefir-grains were introduced in Tibet in the late 1800 to early 1900′s. TM appear to originate from where all milk kefir-grains are believed to originated i.e. the Caucasus Mountains. This also seems to be the case with SL in certain parts of China or other parts of Asian. There is also a Chinese medicinal herb that’s known as Snow Lotus.

One can change the nutrient content by simply fermenting for shorter or longer periods. Both stages have different health benefits. For instance, kefir over-ripened (which increases the sour taste) significantly increases folic acid content.[4] The title of one study (funded by Lifeway Foods) claims that kefir also aids in lactose digestion as a catalyst.[5] However, the study only shows that there is simply a lower amount of lactose in kefir than in whole milk. The lactose still had an effect on the lactose-intolerant adults involved in the study. The kefiran in kefir has been shown to suppress an increase in blood pressure and reduce serum cholesterol levels in rats.